Hornady Ammo

Hornady: Accurate, Deadly, Dependable

 

Hornady Manufacturing was built and thrives to this day on a vision for the future, a trait firmly on display in its ability to harness technology, create cutting-edge designs and craft products enthusiasts deserve. The approach is genetic. The business remains family owned and operated after more than 70 years, and the Hornady spirit appears to be contagious, based on the prowess of its research and development teams.

 

Hornady History

 

Joyce Hornady was an avid hunter and shooter who, although deemed too old for service during World War II, taught marksmanship to security forces stationed at Nebraska’s Grand Island Arsenal. The duties didn’t slow his hunting, although the war effort’s drain on stateside supplies made bullets scarce. So, he figured out how to redraw .22-caliber rimfire brass into bullets suitable for centerfire cartridges. Sometime after VJ Day he partnered with Vernon Speer, and the design became available to the public under the “Speer Hornady Bullets” name.

 

Speer moved to Idaho and built his own legend. Hornady stayed in the Heartland and knew the post-war glut of surplus cartridges was good news for recreational shooters, but also understood the bullets they carried were not ideal for hunting. Add the sudden excess of components—brass, powder, primers—that would make the economy of reloading attractive to returning G.I.s and he saw an opportunity.

 

In 1949 he opened the doors of Hornady Manufacturing Company in Grand Island, NE. Its motto was, and still is today, “Accurate, deadly, dependable.” A .30-caliber 150-grain spire-point was the first bullet it made—a design that remains popular.

 

Korean War Slowdown

 

Sales totaled only $10,000 the first year—not enough to put the books in the black—although the figure tripled in the next 12 months. Staff size grew to four, then the Korean Conflict arrived, and its corresponding scarcity in raw materials. Commercial bullet production slowed, and rather than risk layoffs or idle the business, Hornady entered into a contract with the government to manufacture war effort items.

 

The approach worked and after fighting stopped production resumed to normal. Business was good and by 1958 it the company had outgrown the mid-town building it launched from—formerly an auto body shop. That year the company opened an 8,000-square foot factory west Grand Island, in an area outside city limits. The facility even included a 200-yard, underground range for testing, another testament to the company’s foresight. The location was remote at the time, but today it’s surrounded by buildings.  

 

Hornady Innovation and Cartridges

 

Hornady added sales and marketing staff in the 1960s and the pension for innovation shined when company experiments identified an improved bullet design. The secant ogive spire point was the result, and it’s still used in most pointed-bullet profiles to this day. The technical-sounding approach, in simplest terms, improves ballistic coefficient and exterior ballistics by increasing the radius of the circle reflected by the pointy/rounded end of the bullet—in effect, smoothing things, improving aerodynamics and decreasing drag. Common sense, except if that radius gets too large accuracy is lost and if you sacrifice too much of the projectile’s straight-walled section it can have problems settling into the barrel’s rifling. Thankfully the engineers and ballisticians have done all the heavy calculus.

 

It wasn’t long until the company was offering everything from .22- to .45-caliber bullets for reloaders. Then, in 1964, Hornady rolled out its Frontier Ammunition line of cartridges. Built from surplus brass and Hornady projectiles at strict manufacturing tolerances, it quickly gained favor for performance and affordability.

 

Staff grew to 40 and sales climbed at an annual rate of 30 percent. Consumer demand was so great that manufacturing space was expanded to 25,000-square feet.

 

When the Vietnam war began the company faced a different challenge, though. Surplus brass vanished and, to ensure production continued uninterrupted, Hornady entered into mutually beneficial agreements with other major manufacturers. A byproduct of those relationships continues to this day—seen in the number of Hornady bullets in cartridges assembled by other companies.

 

Joyce Hornady’s youngest son, Steve, came to work for Hornady Manufacturing in 1970. Then in 1971 Hornady Manufacturing purchased Pacific Tool Company—Steve Hornady’s former employer—which had been making reloading presses and gear since 1928. One of the company’s last designs, a progressive press, was so innovative that it continues to be popular to this day.  

 

Despite all the success and challenged, the emphasis on technology and improvement never faltered. In 1965 its engineers developed the Innergroove, scoring inside the bullet to ensure proper “upset” (mushrooming) on impact. The InterLock, which minimizes separation by using an interior ring, came in 1977.  

 

Overcoming Tragedy

 

Joyce Hornady and two members of his staff died on Jan. 15, 1981, while traveling to the firearm industry’s annual Shooting Hunting and Outdoor Trade Show.

 

Steve Hornady took over as president. His wife Marval, who had already been working for the company for nearly a decade, became chairman of the board. Joyce’s daughter, Margaret Hornady David and her husband left corporate positions at Polaroid to join the team.

 

Hornady Ammunition

 

What followed is a rapid and unparalleled harnessing of groundbreaking technology in the company’s cartridges and bullets. A large part of that is the engineers the company has attracted, but without management willing to risk it on a concept, none of it would be possible. If you’re one of the many 6.5 Creedmoor fans, you can thank Hornady. It introduced the cartridge in 2007. More recently it gave us the 6.5 PRC and .300 PRC cartridges. Want reliable feeding and stopping power in your self-defense handgun? Hornady has the answer.

 

Hornady Critical Defense

 

One failure in your self-defense gun with your preferred carry cartridge is not acceptable. It’s a simple stovepipe on the range, but in a criminal confrontation, the results can be fatal. Hornady’s Critical Defense and Critical Duty lineup harnesses the company’s FTX (Flex Tip) Bullet tip technology that helps avoid feeding problems, minimizes clogging through barriers like clothing, yet delivers fight-stopping terminal performance. The former is fine-tuned for home- and self-defense, the latter tailored for law enforcement officers, who require better barrier penetration as they protect and serve. The cartridges are available for most handguns and even some long guns.

 

Hornady Custom XTP

 

The ultimate in self-defense loads from the company, however, may be it's Custom XTP (eXtreme Terminal Performance) line of cartridges. Renowned for their accuracy, the projectile is a hollowpoint covered in a jacket of gilding metal to ensure unfailing feeding. Serrations ensure proper upset on impact and the swaged core ensures in-flight stability with proper expansion. It’s available for a variety of chamberings.

 

Hornady LEVERevolution

 

Historically, one of the big limitations to lever-action rifles is a tubular magazine that requires cartridges to line up, single file. If those loads feature a ballistically superior pointed bullet and one of them strikes the primer ahead with enough force, the results are more than just “surprising.” Hornady was the first to solve the problem and put some exterior ballistics back into the equation using the same FTX technology.

 

Hornady A-MAX

 

When precision is key and performance cannot be compromised, take a close look at this Hornady line—from bullets for that precision reloader, to complete cartridges. The A-MAX projectile starts with a secant ogive profile to improve external ballistics, adds a swaged lead core to improve shot-to-shot repeatability and puts it in the company’s AMP jacket, which has virtually zero deviation in wall thickness.  Add an ultra-low drag tip to improve ballistic coefficient and its an ideal option for anyone trying to make that long-distance connection, or dozens of them.

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7 product(s)

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  1. Hornady .308 Diameter Bullets - 150 Grain FMJBT - 100 Count

    Hornady .308 Diameter Bullets - 150 Grain FMJBT - 100 Count

    $32.00

    In stock

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    Cost Per Bullet 32.0¢ per bullet
    Bullet Weight 150 Grain
    Bullet Caliber 30 Caliber, 300 AAC Blackout, 308 Win
    Quantity 100
    Bullet Type Full Metal Jacket Boat Tail (FMJ-BT)
    Manufacturer Hornady
    Manufacturer SKU 3037

    Customer Reviews

    Very consistent grains.

    Good price, fast shipping.

    Review by Gary (Posted on 2/10/2021)

    Cherry

    Bugga is cherry

    Review by Myabingy (Posted on 1/27/2021)

    Cherry

    Bugga is cherry

    Review by Miah (Posted on 1/24/2021)

  2. Hornady 500 S&W Magnum Bullets (.500) 300 Grain XTP HP - 50

    $40.00

    In stock

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    Cost Per Bullet 80.0¢ per bullet
    Bullet Weight 300 Grain
    Bullet Caliber 50 AE, 50 Caliber, 500 S&W Magnum
    Quantity 50
    Bullet Type XTP
    Manufacturer Hornady
    Manufacturer SKU 50101

  3. Hornady Frontier 5.56x45 62 Grain FMJ – 20 Rounds

    $21.85

    In stock

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    Manufacturer Hornady
    Condition New
    Bullet Weight 62 Grain
    Bullet Type Full Metal Jacket (FMJ)
    Use Type plinking at the range
    Casing Type Brass
    Quantity 20
    Ammo Caliber 5.56x45mm
    Manufacturer SKU FR260
    Primer Type Boxer
    Magnetic No
    UPC Barcode 090255711516
    Cost Per Round $1.09 per round

    Are you looking for good target shooting ammunition for your AR-15 – or any other rifle that can run 5.56x45 through its chamber? Then put the hounds back on their leashes and call off the search. You are now looking at Hornady Frontier ammo!

    This round sports an FMJ bullet. It’s the simple kind of design you want for target shooting, becase terminal ballistics don’t really matter much when all you are shooting is paper. (Still, we wouldn’t pass on FMJ ammo for self-defense simply because it cannot expand in soft tissue.) This round’s 62 grain bullet is the same weight as the M855, although it hasn’t got a steel penetrator tip. The nonmagnetic bullet thus offers comparable ballistic performance to the penetrator – 3,060 fps out of a 20” barrel – and makes an effective way to train .

    These cartridges are loaded at the US government’s Lake City Army Ammunition Plant. Their military grade brass cases are drawn to consistent dimensions and remain supple over the course of several successive handloads. Their sensitive primers won’t rust out your barrel, and their propellant is formulated to minimize residue buildup.

  4. Hornady Frontier 223 Rem 55 Grain HP Match – 20 Rounds

    $25.15

    In stock

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    Manufacturer Hornady
    Condition New
    Bullet Weight 55 Grain
    Bullet Type Hollow-Point (HP)
    Use Type match or precision shooting, plinking at the range
    Casing Type Brass
    Quantity 20
    Ammo Caliber 223 Remington
    Manufacturer SKU FR140
    Primer Type Boxer
    Magnetic No
    UPC Barcode 090255711349
    Cost Per Round $1.26 per round

    This Frontier label 223 Rem ammunition by Hornady is great for all the long-distance shooters out there. It showcases the Nebraskan master’s HP Match, which is basically 55 grains of nothing but accuracy-enhancing features.

    The HP Match’s swaged lead core is highly uniform, and doesn’t possess air pockets that could impact its balance. Its AMP jacket is drawn with virtually zero runout or variations in its wall thickness. The HP Match is also extremely sleek, from its narrow meplat to its secant ogive geometry to its sloping boat tail.

    This round’s HP Match bursts out of a 24” barrel at a velocity of 3,240 fps. So well-balanced and streamlined a bullet exhibits a G1 BC of 0.254, and can be counted on to remain supersonic beyond 700 yards. Whether you’re shooting targets or varmints, so flat a trajectory is certain to come in very handy.

    The Lake City Army Ammunition Plant loads this AR-15 ammo. Widener’s customers who can’t get enough brass are sure to find a good use for this ammo’s new production cases, which are visibly annealed and long-lasting. Lake City’s military-grade primers, propellant and loading practices deliver reliable performance however you shoot!

  5. Hornady Frontier 223 Rem 68 Grain BTHP Match – 20 Rounds

    $25.85

    In stock

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    Manufacturer Hornady
    Condition New
    Bullet Weight 68 Grain
    Bullet Type Hollow-Point Boat Tail (HP-BT)
    Use Type match or precision shooting, plinking at the range, varmint hunting
    Casing Type Brass
    Quantity 20
    Ammo Caliber 223 Remington
    Manufacturer SKU FR160
    Primer Type Boxer
    Magnetic No
    UPC Barcode 090255711387
    Cost Per Round $1.29 per round

    The American frontier is gone, but Hornady Frontier keeps going strong! This is the 223 Rem ammo you want to chamber when accuracy is key – grouping tight shots through paper, or landing a single bullet clean between a gopher’s peepers.

    Hornady utilizes their industry’s most advanced loading equipment and protocol when they piece together a Frontier load. This American-made ammo’s brass cases are military-grade, and you can see by their annealing that they’re poised to reload several times. This ammo’s primers are also military-grade, which promotes consistent ballistics along with its uniform propellant charges and bullet weights.

    Each bullet is Hornady’s accurate BTHP Match. It features its manufacturer’s Advanced Manufacturing Process jacket and a form-fitted swaged lead core, both of which enhance in-flight stability to ensure the meplat is always pointed at its target. The BTHP Match’s secant ogive profile, boat tail and narrow hollow point meplat all decrease in-flight drag to flatten trajectory. Zero in at 200 yards and you can expect only 7.5” of bullet drop at 300!

    The BTHP Match’s hollow point doesn’t affect terminal ballistics by creating expansion. The impact of a 68 grain bullet alone ought to take care of most varmint hunting and self-defense applications, though.

  6. Hornady Custom 9mm 124 Grain XTP JHP - 25 Rounds

    $35.85

    In stock

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    Manufacturer Hornady
    Condition New
    Bullet Weight 124 Grain
    Bullet Type Jacketed Hollow-Point (JHP)
    Use Type home defense
    Casing Type Brass
    Quantity 25
    Ammo Caliber 9mm Luger (9x19)
    Manufacturer SKU 90242
    Primer Type Boxer
    Magnetic No
    UPC Barcode 090255902426
    Cost Per Round $1.43 per round

    Since right after World War Two, Hornady has been providing quality ammunition for all. Founded out of the need for accurate and reliable ammo, when virtually all that was available was low quality, military surplus ammunition, Hornady has continued to stay true to their mission and come to the forefront of the ammo world.

    If you are looking for fantastic, self defense ammunition, Hornady Custom XTP is the round for you. XTP stands for "Extreme Terminal Performance," and this ammo does just that. These 124 grain, jacketed hollow point bullets are designed to have maximum, controlled, terminal expansion and steady trajectory. Not only is this brand exceptional, the 9mm is also a fantastic self defense round, recently declared by the FBI to be the best round of all. These phenomenal rounds are perfect for defending yourself.

  7. Hornady .510 Diameter Bullets - 750 Grain A-MAX - 20 Count

    $52.00

    In stock

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    Cost Per Bullet $2.60 per bullet
    Bullet Weight 750 Grain
    Bullet Caliber 50 BMG
    Quantity 20
    Bullet Type Polymer Tipped
    Manufacturer Hornady
    Manufacturer SKU 5165

    Hornady's A-MAX line is the result of more than 50 years of studying bullet performance. Each projectile in this box of 20 is .510" in diameter and weighs 750 grains. These bullets are engineered to provide match and competition shooters with the highest level of consistency and reliability. These projectiles feature a low drag tip and a secant ogive profile to raise the ballistic coeffieient and increase in-flight stability. Each bullet has a swaged lead core that is wrapped in Hornaday's AMP copper jacket. The results are a bullet that is extremely uniform and has near zero wall thickness variation.

    Don't forget to check out Widener's selection of Brass, while you're here.

    **This is not loaded ammunition.**

    Customer Reviews

    good out to at least 1000 yds

    My three 50's shoot these A-maxes very consistently at 1000 yd matches. Wideners has always been a good source of 50 BMG components and they run sales on these products as well. I am a long time Wideners customer. They offer good products at good prices. They are my go to place for reloading everything.

    Review by Richard (Posted on 4/17/2016)

7 product(s)